Sunday, April 22, 2018

e commerce etics

 
Same as what every business needs - greater reach, expanding customer base, be ahead of your competitors and diversify (in time and if needed).
Objectives
e-commerce means business over internet, in the most layman-est of terms.
So you harvest all the benefits internet has to offer, some being:
1. Reach out to a larger audience - internet access is becoming so mainstream now that your product/service can reach almost everyone on the planet with a internet-enabled device.
2. Your virtual shop remains open and operational 24x7 even if you/your staff are not working- this might not be wholly true if your product is a service-which requires immediate human-intervention
3.  In most cases; you need not maintain the whole stock of products - again this varies for different business models and will work greatly if you have a good supplier who does not defaults on supplies and a good shipping partner/team who work in sync for delivery
4. You build your brand more quickly - as more people will know and talk and post and blog about you on social networks - duh! :)
5. Once your brand is build you can diversify easily and also pull out of a certain segment if that does not works out for you with minimal losses -
typical example will be Flipkart's music(tunes) store which closed off even being a great initiative.
6. For most part; setting up a website and maintaining it is lots cheaper given the plethora of hosting services available.
7. Also with the new crop of 3PL partners (within India) like Aramex, Delhivery etc your shipping can also be outsourced

Types of e commerce

Generally speaking, when we think of e-commerce, we think of an online commercial transaction between a supplier and a client. However, and although this idea is right, we can be more specific and actually divide e-commerce into six major types, all with different characteristics.

There are 6 basic types of e-commerce:

  1. Business-to-Business (B2B)
  2. Business-to-Consumer (B2C)
  3. Consumer-to-Consumer (C2C)
  4. Consumer-to-Business (C2B).
  5. Business-to-Administration (B2A)
  6. Consumer-to-Administration (C2A)

1. Business-to-Business (B2B)

Business-to-Business (B2B) e-commerce encompasses all electronic transactions of goods or services conducted ​​between companies. Producers and traditional commerce wholesalers typically operate with this type of electronic commerce.

2. Business-to-Consumer (B2C)

The Business-to-Consumer type of e-commerce is distinguished by the establishment of electronic business relationships between businesses and final consumers. It corresponds to the retail section of e-commerce, where traditional retail trade normally operates.
These types of relationships can be easier and more dynamic, but also more sporadic or discontinued. This type of commerce has developed greatly, due to the advent of the web, and there are already many virtual stores and malls on the Internet, which sell all kinds of consumer goods, such as computers, software, books, shoes, cars, food, financial products, digital publications, etc.
When compared to buying retail in traditional commerce, the consumer usually has more information available in terms of informative content and there is also a widespread idea that you’ll be buying cheaper, without jeopardizing an equally personalized customer service, as well as ensuring quick processing and delivery of your order.

3. Consumer-to-Consumer (C2C)

Consumer-to-Consumer (C2C) type e-commerce encompasses all electronic transactions of goods or services conducted ​​between consumers. Generally, these transactions are conducted through a third party, which provides the online platform where the transactions are actually carried out.

4. Consumer-to-Business (C2B)

In C2B there is a complete reversal of the traditional sense of exchanging goods. This type of e-commerce is very common in crowdsourcing based projects. A large number of individuals make their services or products available for purchase for companies seeking precisely these types of services or products.
Examples of such practices are the sites where designers present several proposals for a company logo and where only one of them is selected and effectively purchased. Another platform that is very common in this type of commerce are the markets that sell royalty-free photographs, images, media and design elements, such as iStockphoto.

5. Business-to-Administration (B2A)

This part of e-commerce encompasses all transactions conducted online between companies and public administration. This is an area that involves a large amount and a variety of services, particularly in areas such as fiscal, social security, employment, legal documents and registers, etc. These types of services have increased considerably in recent years with investments made in e-government.

6. Consumer-to-Administration (C2A)

The Consumer-to-Administration model encompasses all electronic transactions conducted between individuals and public administration.
Examples of applications include:
  • Education – disseminating information, distance learning, etc.
  • Social Security – through the distribution of information, making payments, etc.
  • Taxes – filing tax returns, payments, etc.
  • Health – appointments, information about illnesses, payment of health services, etc.
Both models involving Public Administration (B2A and C2A) are strongly associated to the idea of efficiency and easy usability of the services provided to citizens by the government, with the support of information and communication technologies.


Saturday, April 21, 2018

E-commerce

E-commerce is the activity of buying or selling of products and services online or over the internet. Electronic commerce draws on technologies such as mobile commerce, electronic funds transfer, supply chain management, Internet marketing, online transaction processing, electronic data interchange (EDI), inventory management systems, and automated data collection systems.
Modern electronic commerce typically uses the World Wide Web for at least one part of the transaction's life cycle although it may also use other technologies such as e-mail. Typical e-commerce transactions include the purchase of online books (such as Amazon) and music purchases (music download in the form of digital distribution such as iTunes Store), and to a less extent, customized/personalized online liquor store inventory services. There are three areas of e-commerce: online retailing, electric markets, and online auctions. E-commerce is supported by electronic business.
E-commerce businesses may also employ some or all of the followings:
Online shopping for retail sales direct to consumers via Web sites and mobile apps, and conversational commerce via live chat, chatbots, and voice assistants
Providing or participating in online marketplaces, which process third-party business-to-consumer or consumer-to-consumer sales
Business-to-business buying and selling;
Gathering and using demographic data through web contacts and social media
Business-to-business (B2B) electronic data interchange
Marketing to prospective and established customers by e-mail or fax (for example, with newsletters)
Engaging in pretail for launching new products and services
Online financial exchanges for currency exchanges or trading purpose.






e commerce etics

  Same as what every business needs - greater reach, expanding customer base, be ahead of your competitors and diversify (in time and if...